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Photo Post by Vicky Merritt

Douglas Unified School District #27, Douglas High School Land Lab. One of the ways that we have been able to build infrastructure is to repurpose and recycle farm and ranch materials and equipment.  The raised garden beds that we use on the Land Lab are actually retired liquid feed troughs from local ranches.  They have holes in the bottom for drainage, some have hoops built over them for shade and all of them have a water source.  This method makes gardening fast, effective, trouble free and manageable. Look around your rural community for retired troughs that you can fill with soil and amendments and actually compost and grow at the same time.
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Photo Post by Vicky Merritt

Douglas Unified School District #27, Douglas High School Land Lab... Our FFA Chapter, led by Ms. Brita Kimble plays a huge roll in the success of the Land Lab.  
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Photo Post by Vicky Merritt

Douglas Unified School District #27, Douglas HIgh School Land Lab, Douglas, Arizona! Besides gardening, our land lab activities include an FFA SAE poultry project.
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Photo Post by Vicky Merritt

Thank you to the Western Grower's Foundation for a grant to our Douglas Unified School District #27, Douglas High School Land Lab!  Our Land Lab is 3.7 acres and includes gardens grown by CTE Agriculture, Science, Special Education & Culinary departments, the Douglas FFA Chapter and our own "Bulldog" 4-H Club. Founded in 1990, we are still teaching students how to grown their own food!
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Question Post by Laura Randolph

Double Adobe School is looking forward to creating a garden this spring. Are there any helpful tips to remember as we begin the school garden process?
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Photo Post by Danitza Hill

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Hello, We are Danitza Hill and Ashley Stanton from Greenway Elementary in Bisbee, Arizona. We are new to the Collective School Garden Network and are posting our first blog with pictures that we took earlier this school year in the Fall. We have had a school garden for several years, but it has become rather neglected over the past couple of years and we as a fourth grade team, with the help of a few other teachers, are trying to get the garden back in order and up to par, so that it can be used schoolwide as a teaching tool and a community garden. We have a question on how to eradicate our overwhelming amount of bermuda grass that has crept into our beds while they were dormant over the summer months. Are there any ideas or suggestions on how we can get rid of this grass without having to replace all the soil in the current beds? You can see from the pictures that our students did an excellent job of removing as much as they could so that we could start some fall/winter crops, but the roots are still deep in the soil. We are open to any suggestions and look forward to hearing what you have tried and may help us clear out this problem so that our garden can look as beautiful as we envision it to be.
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