ABSTRACT: Although educators widely use school gardens for experiential education, researchers have not systematically examined the evaluative literature on school-gardening outcomes. The author reviewed the U.S. literature on children’s gardening, taking into account potential effects, schoolgardening outcomes, teacher evaluations of gardens as learning tools, and methodological issues. Quantitative studies showed positive outcomes of school-gardening initiatives in the areas of science achievement and food behavior, but they did not demonstrate that children’s environmental attitude or social behavior consistently improve with gardening. Validity and reliability issues reduced general confidence in these results. Qualitative studies documented a wider scope of desirable outcomes, including an array of positive social and environmental behaviors. Gardening enthusiasm varies among teachers, depending on support and horticultural confidence.

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Journal: 
Journal of Environmental Education
Author Last Name: 
Blair
Author First Name: 
Dorothy
Publication Month: 
January
Publication Year: 
2009
Research Source: 
http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-223527478.html